Recente Posts

Saturday, 4 February 2017

Dutch Court Sword / Staatsiedegen



If one collect Dutch court swords it seems you always find or see a type you do not have while you already have a considerable collection. It is save to say that you never will be complete or at least not be sure about it. The Dutch had there swords made by every possible maker in Europe. And by the Dutch is not meant the goverment but every single Dutchman who was allowed to wear a court sword.

The court sword was allways connected with a civil uniform. And all those uniforms where regulated by the state of The Netherlands. Every uniform is discribed by law and still exist today (exept for the Mayor uniform). The Dutch goverment however was as stingy as it can be and never issued one single uniform and court sword. You had to pay for them yourself.

The Dutch goverment only said the Dutch coat of arms had to be present with the motto Je maintiendrai. This gave the manufacturers the possibility to prelude on the overall design. And they did, by the hundreds. So every European sword maker had an example of a Dutch court sword. But to their, the Dutchman, great disapointment none of them was cheap. They all where in high quality with dito prices.

I show you three pieces of my own collection. 

Fig. 1.: It is not the design but the dragon and the white scrabbard. The white scrabbard was only used by a Diplomat and a Minister of Cabinet. But by attaching a M1948 dragon it can only be a diplomat of any rank within the diplomatic corps. Only Diplomats (since 1948) and Chamberlains (since 1897) had a dragon with their court sword. The court sword is made by E. and F. Köhler, Solingen. 

Fig. 2.: The sword has a scarce ivory grip. Some regulations state that the grip had to be of mother of pearl. In this case it seems a custom made sword where the regulations did not provide. The coat of arms has the lions looking you straight in the eyes. By 1907 the Dutch goverment redisigned the lions now looking to the shield. And all the manufactures followed that order with the consequence that todays collector of Dutch court swords has no longer any idea where it ends.

Fig. 3.: This is the only sword more or less prescribed in the regulations. It hat to be gold plated, have a gold plate top mount on the scrabbard of 9cm and a gold plated end mount of 12cm, mother of pearl grips. A dragon made of gold wire (M1897). All of this was drawn and was an offical part of the formal regulation. That meant the design of the sword was known. The hilt had to be near straight with an oval cross guard. So this is a Chamberlains court sword. On the blade there is the name of the dealer: A.A. Knuyver en Zonen Den Haag. Mister Knuyver started as court supplier at 1858.
There is an annoying thing about this sword. If you ever encounter the same type but without the dragon you can not say that it is a Dutch chamberlain court sword. All German manufaturers adopted this type as a regular one. Everybody could buy it but only for the chamberlain it was obliged. It only becomes a chamberlain sword with the M1897 dragon attched.

The dragon on most court swords ar fastened in a dubious way. The Dutch has regulations for the dragon on some infantry swords, Navy officer sword and the M1820 officer sword but not for the court swords for diplomats and chamberlains. The reason for this was a strong opposition from the members of the branches. If there was a court dinner all the court swords where piled up at the lobby. Afterwards every diplomat and chamberlain had to find out which court sword belonged to him. With no regultions on the knotting of the dragon, one personalized the knotting of the dragon to the extend that it was indeed becoming dubious. But now every diplomat and chamberlain could find his court sword without any doubt. 

Friday, 6 January 2017

Persian Diplomat Uniform


Hardly seen on the market a Persian uniform in an outstanding shape. A small dealer closed his business and I was only looking for the chest embroided ones. There where none but then he came with this uniform. It was Persian so much was clear, but the story behind the uniform was not clear at all. The dealer told me that he bought the uniform from Serné and Sons, Tailors, Amsterdam, Holland. The uniform was left at the tailor by it's owner around 1920 and he never collected it again. Serné opend his doors in 1866 and closed them in 1990. So the uniform was stored for 70 years waiting for this rightfull owner who never showed up.


The story leaves some questions. The uniform has three labels. Two are from Serné and the other one reads: DONNY, PAVILLON DE ROHAN, PARIS. Donny was the leading European tailor for Civil Uniforms. The house Donny presented it self as 'Specialité de Livrées'. And that means civil uniforms with rich embroidery. Donny, for some unkown reason to me, closed his 'Maison' around 1910. On the other hand the label of Serné is intersting too for the Dutch Coat of Arms shows two lions who are looking you straight in the eyes. The crest was alternate by law of 1907. By then the lions are facing en profile.
 

This means that the uniform was made in Paris before 1907. The button has a Qajar Coat of Arms. The tail of the lion had to be a S shape according a decree from 1910. The lion on the button has a straight tail. So this all indicates a uniform before 1907.


What had Serné to do with a Paris made Persian uniform before 1907 and kept it till 1990? There are some repairs to the uniform. Not on the outside but on some places the interior has other silk. Clearly it was damaged and Serné repleced some pieces. So before 1907 a Persian diplomat gave the uniform to Serné to repair the silk. The uniform is not from an ambassador. Those uniforms has the bottom side diagonal also embroidered. So it could be a Resident Minister or General-Consul. I found two pictures on the web that are close to the uniform.

Persian diplomat Ali Kuli Khan, 1913, Washinton D.C., Getty Images
 
Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Minister Samad Khan Momtaz (middle), Persian diplomatic delagation 1910.
The man first left on the second row wears a similar uniform.
Samad Khan was minister for the Netherlands till 1905. After that he became extraordinary and Plenipotentairy Minister in Paris. Did Samad Khan leave his uniform to Serné in Amsterdam to repair and had no need for it when he became one step higher which acquired a more elaborate uniform? That would be nice but we will never know.
 
But there is something else. The Dutch had Persian General-Consuls situated in Amsterdam. Rich merchants who became honorary consuls. There where three of them during that period. From 1889 till 1902 Herman Hesse, from 1902 till 1906 A.M. de Block and finaly from 1906 till 1919 J.P. Nord Thomson. Why is this interesting? I found a picture of Nord Thomson wearing a General-Consul uniform of Persia.
 
Joseph Philip Nord Thomson (1859-1942)
That means that also non Persians where allowed to wear a Persian diplomatic uniform. It is a different uniform as we look to the embroidery so the uniform is not of that of Thomson. Then we have Hesse and Block left. I have no pictures of them so everything is still possible.
 
Some details of the uniform.
 
Back

Holding the belt on place

Chest
 
 

Monday, 19 December 2016

Heinrich Hoffmann postcards/postkarte 'main serie' 851 - 900


No. 853

Title:
"Die deutsche Wehrmacht"
Torpedoboot in Fahrt
 

              No picture yet              
No. 854


              No picture yet              
No. 863

No. 864

Title:
"Die deutsche Wehrmacht"
Der Führer bei den Fliegern

No. 865

Title:
"Die deutsche Wehrmacht"
Der Oberste Befehlshaber der
deutschen Wehrmacht
schreitet die Ehrenkompanie ab

              No picture yet              
No. 866

              No picture yet              
No. 867

No. 868

Title:
"Die deutsche Wehrmacht"
Gar lustig ist's, Soldat zu sein


No. 869

Title:
Der Führer besichtigt den Arbeitsdienst


No. 871

Title:
Mahnmal

No. 872

Title:
München.
Haus der Deutschen Kunst

No. 872a

Title:
München.
Haus der Deutschen Kunst


No. 878

Title:
Der Königliche Platz in München


No. 881

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Blick aus der große Halle

No. 882

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Teilansicht aus der Groen Halle

No. 883

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Große Halle

No. 884

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Große Halle

No. 885

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Arbeitszimmer des Führers

No. 886

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Wohnzimmer

No. 887

Title:
Berghof Wachenfeld
Fremdenzimmer

No. 888

Title:
Berghof Wachenfeld
Speisesaal

No. 889

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Fremdenzimmer

No. 890

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
No subtitle

No. 891

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Wintergarten
 

No. 892

Title:
Der Berghof
                      Obersalzberg                     
Eingang

No. 893

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Große Halle

No. 894

Title:
Der Berghof Obersalzberg
Wintergarten

Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Heinrich Hoffmann postcards/postkarte 'main serie' 501 - 550


No picture yet
              No. 501             

No picture yet
              No. 502             

No. 503

Title:
Reichsarbeitsführer
Hierl

Konstantin Hierl
(1875-1955)


No picture yet
                No. 507               

N0. 508

Title:
         Chef des Stabes         
der S.A.
Viktor Lutze

Viktor Lutze
(1890-1943)
 

No. 509

No title




Adolf Hitler
(1889-1945) with
Konstantin Hierl

No picture yet
                 No. 510                

No. 511

Title:
Der oberste
Befehlshaber

Adolf Hitler

No. 512

No title



            Adolf Hitler           


      No picture yet     
No. 519

No. 520

No title


Adolf Hitler

No. 521

Title:
          Stabschef Lutze          

Viktor Lutze


No. 531

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Mosaiksaal

No. 532

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Marmorgalerie

No. 533

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Großer Empfangssaal

No. 534

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Reichskabinettsaal

No. 535

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Seitengang zum Arbeitszimmer
des Führers

No. 536

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Wartezimmer beim Führer
 

No. 537

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Arbeitszimmer des
Obergruppenführers
Brückner

No. 538

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Runde Halle

 

No. 539

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Durchblick zum
Mosaiksaal
 

No. 540

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Eingang zum
großen Empfangssaal


 

No. 541

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Wartezimmer



 

No. 542

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei
Berlin
Architekt Professor
Albert Speer

Marmorgalerie
Wache vor dem
Eingang zum
Arbeitszimmer des
Führers

No. 543

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
     Architekt Professor Albert Speer    

Arbeitszimmer des Führers

No. 544

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Arbeitszimmer des Führers

No. 545

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

No title

No. 546

Title:
Neue Reichskanzlei Berlin
Architekt Professor Albert Speer

Innenhof